Author Topic: Elderly Bronchitis  (Read 14 times)

fanniegoodman

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Elderly Bronchitis
« on: August 01, 2016, 01:22:42 am »
Elderly Bronchitis - Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Classification, Uses and Side Effects
The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

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The fluoroquinolones are a family of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with bactericidal activity. The parent of the group is nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962 by Lescher and colleagues. The first fluoroquinolones were widely used because they were the only orally administered agents available for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-negative organisms, including Pseudomonas species. We have gone through extensive research and reading to produce this article on Chronic Bronchitis. Use the information wisely so that the information will be properly used.

Fluoroquinolones are approved for use only in people older than 18. They can affect the growth of bones, teeth, and cartilage in a child or fetus. The FDA has assigned fluoroquinolones to pregnancy risk category C, indicating that these drugs have the potential to cause teratogenic or embryocidal effects. Giving fluoroquinolones during pregnancy is not recommended unless the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus. These agents are also excreted in breast milk and should be avoided during breast-feeding if at all possible. :)

Second Generation
The second-generation fluoroquinolones have increased gram-negative activity, as well as some gram-positive and atypical pathogen coverage. Compared with first-generation quinolones, these drugs have broader clinical applications in the herbal medicines for common breathing problems tract infections and pyelonephritis, sexually transmitted diseases, selected pneumonias and skin infections. If you find anything extra mentioning about Chronic Bronchitis, do inform us. It is only through the exchange of views and information will we learn more about Chronic Bronchitis.

Conditions treated with Fluoroquinolones: indications and uses  The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. The serum elimination half-life of the fluoroquinolones range from 3 -20 hours, allowing for once or twice daily dosing. Get more familiar with Bronchitis once you finish reading this article. Only then will you realize the importance of Bronchitis in your day to day life.

Third Generation
The third-generation fluoroquinolones are separated into a third class because of their expanded activity against gram-positive organisms, particularly penicillin-sensitive and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Although the third-generation agents retain broad gram-negative coverage, they are less active than ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas species.

Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin. People have an inclination of bragging on the knowledge they have on any particular project. However, we don't want to brag on what we know on Chronic Bronchitis, so long as it proves useful to you, we are happy.

First Generation
The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance. We wish to stress on the importance and the necessity of Bronchitis through this article. This is because we see the need of propagating its necessity and importance!

Classification of Fluoroquinolones
As a group, the fluoroquinolones have excellent in vitro activity against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The newest fluoroquinolones have enhanced activity against gram-positive bacteria with only a minimal decrease in activity against gram-negative bacteria. Their expanded gram-positive activity is especially important because it includes significant activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Even if you are a stranger in the world of Bronchitis, once you are through with this article, you will no longer have to consider yourself to be a stranger in it!

Second-generation agents include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is the most potent fluoroquinolone against P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are the most widely used second-generation quinolones because of their availability in oral and intravenous formulations and their broad set of FDA-labeled indications.

Side Effects
The fluoroquinolones as a class are generally well tolerated. Most adverse effects are mild in severity, self-limited, and rarely result in treatment discontinuation. However, they can have serious adverse effects. You will learn the avoid the flu and bronchitis at work you are through reading this matter. Bronchitis are very important, so learn its importance.

Fourth Generation
The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones add significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobes while maintaining the gram-positive and gram-negative activity of the third-generation drugs. They also retain activity against Pseudomonas species comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones include trovafloxacin (Trovan).

Fluoroquinolones Advantages:
Ease of administration Daily or twice daily dosing  Excellent oral absorption Excellent tissue penetration  Prolonged half-lives Significant entry into phagocytic cells Efficacy Overall safety A substantial amount of the words here are all inter-connected to and about Bronchitis. Understand them to get an overall understanding on Bronchitis.

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